Understanding Black Racism Post Civil War in The Hateful Eight

Understanding Black Racism Post Civil War in The Hateful Eight

Looking plainly, The Hateful Eight may come off as another bloody film of Tarantino. True, the actions are great, but this film tells us more than just murder. In fact, under all those actions, The Hateful Eight tries to tell us how black racism was post-Civil War.

It Wasn’t Intentional

Despite the obvious imagery of black racism issues, Tarantino didn’t intentionally write The Hateful Eight to portray the issue. In fact, he wrote it before a protest against police brutality became a hot topic at all. The Hateful Eight was supposed to continue the universe of Django, which reveals the ugly life during the 60s.

“We’re not trying to make it timely. (But) It is timely.” he reacted about the boom to Vulture, “I love the fact that people are talking and dealing with the institutional racism that has existed in this country and been ignored.” And indeed, The Hateful Eight did make judi bola people think about black racism with the most violent imagery possible.

Portrayed in Violence

There are several striking scenes in The Hateful Eight that portrays black racism during the post-Civil War. The most obvious one is the past where the Domergue gang annihilated everyone in Minnie’s Haberdashery, Minnie herself included. Minnie is a black woman who achieved Lincoln’s dream to achieve inter-racial harmony in her bar, whom disappearance became one of the mysteries of The Hateful Eight.

Another scene laid back at the ending, on the last moments of both Mannix’s and Warren’s life. They were portraying opposing sides in the Civil War. But after turns of events (and Daisy’s lengthy monologue), Mannix bonded with Warren and somehow achieved the Lincoln dream Warren always uphold.

Was The “N’ Word Used Too Much?

Like any Tarantino’s work, The Hateful Eight doesn’t hold back on showing more at the point it became too much. But, no, it wasn’t the violent fights and bloodbaths that make this movie seems unbearable. It’s the fact that, despite provoking thoughts on Black Lives Matter, there was a surplus amount of “n’ word throughout the dialogue. So, before watching, there’s a need to keep an open mind that the movie may be offensive to African-Americans, especially if you are one.

Some people may get put-off by how the script used the “n’ word so liberally. However, that in itself show how people at the time tend to be socially insensitive which is, sadly, still happens today. Yes, the story doesn’t mince and deliver the detestable parts coarse, but that’s exactly why the movie is called “The Hateful Eight”.

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